Pilot messages reveal 2016 concerns over safety of Boeing 737 MAX

Pilot messages reveal 2016 concerns over safety of Boeing 737 MAX


JUDY WOODRUFF: Newly revealed messages from
Boeing pilots show that the company has known for several months now that there were concerns
being raised by pilots about the 737 MAX’s safety. It’s leading to questions of whether Boeing
misled the Federal Aviation Administration. Amna Nawaz is back with the story. AMNA NAWAZ: That’s right, Judy. The messages in question were sent by a Boeing
pilot back in 2016. That was more than two years before two fatal
airline crashes involving that 737 MAX. Those crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed
346 people. Now, an automated flight control and anti-stall
system that is known as MCAS is at the heart of ongoing investigations. When the system was still being certified
in 2016, the Boeing pilot messaged a second pilot, saying the system was difficult to
control in flight simulations. In some of the messages, he wrote this — quote
— “Granted, I suck at flying, but even this was egregious.” And then there are — quote — “some real
fundamental issues that they claim they’re aware of.” Now, Boeing has insisted there were no serious
problems during that certification period. But the head of FAA wrote to Boeing today,
asking why the company had not told the government about these messages months ago. David Shepardson of Reuters first broke this
story. He joins me now. Welcome back to “NewsHour.” DAVID SHEPARDSON, Reuters: Thanks. AMNA NAWAZ: So, at the time of the certification
process in 2016, what role are these pilots supposed to be playing? DAVID SHEPARDSON: Right. So, their job is to convince the FAA that
this system is safe under a variety of different simulations, different tests, different various
flight patterns. And during this period, they uncovered, it
appears in these messages, more problems with MCAS, this anti-stall system, than was aware,
because, remember, this system was designed to address the potential that the new plane,
with bigger engines, more fuel-efficient, would stall, would tend to push its nose to
the ground. And Boeing has said this system would just
operate in the background. It wouldn’t — pilots didn’t even need to
know about. It wouldn’t be in the fight manual. And what these messages show or suggest is
that, at least internally, there were more concerns raised about the system than we knew
about. AMNA NAWAZ: Do we have any idea how this conversation
went from here, if it got reported up, if it went all the way up to Boeing executives? DAVID SHEPARDSON: We don’t know that. There are — the Justice Department, the FBI,
the inspector general from the DOT, there are a lot of reviews going on looking at this
very question. We do know there are a lot of concerns that
have been raised in a couple of reports about how the FAA delegates much of the responsibility
for certifying new planes to Boeing itself. And, as a result, Congress today is saying,
hey, we need to take a look at this whole process. Should Boeing be doing much of the work of
certifying the plane that the FAA is responsible for? AMNA NAWAZ: Now, the company, as mentioned,
they found these a few months ago. Why are we just finding out about them right
now? DAVID SHEPARDSON: Well, it goes back to this
issue about the Justice Department. So they — Boeing turned these documents,
we have now learned, over to the FBI in February. And there is some concern about whether — were
there other reasons why — if the FAA’s role or DOT’s role in that certification is being
investigated, was that a legitimate reason for Boeing not to turn those over? I mean, FAA today said, we need those documents. We’re trying to review, ensure that the new
MCAS, when this plane goes back into service, operates properly, and we need to see everything. So — and the question is, are there more
documents? Are there are other shoes to drop about other
concerns about this system? AMNA NAWAZ: And the real heart of this is
the question about what they knew about the MCAS system, based on what we know, in terms
of the role they played in those two fatal crashes, right? DAVID SHEPARDSON: Absolutely, because, remember,
this issue is about the fact that it’s just a misfire, because it got conflicting data
from these sensors on the outside of the airplane. And it only took data from — that had they
had additional safeguards, like the ones that the FAA is demanding now, potentially, could
you have prevented those two crashes? AMNA NAWAZ: Now, the FAA says it’s not going
to lift the grounding on the 737 MAXes until they determine that they are safe to fly. Does these — this new revelation, these messages,
these earlier concerns, does that complicate this process in any way? DAVID SHEPARDSON: Well, it’s certainly more
bad news. We just saw this week that Southwest Airlines,
the largest operator of these planes, has delayed their flights until at least February. Other U.S. airlines are until January. And I do think — I talked to the chairman
of the House Transportation Committee. He said, these do suggest that the FAA needs
to make sure that Boeing is being completely up front, there are no other documents or
other issues about MCAS that aren’t fully resolved. And, look, every deadline so far has been
missed. I mean, this plane was supposed to back in
the air a long time ago. We’re still waiting for a certification flight
first. And then that’s at least another month or
six weeks beyond that, the earliest this plane could go back in the air. So it’s certainly not good news. And, also, remember, the public has to be
confident that they can go back in these airplanes. And that’s probably the bigger issue. Will people go back on the planes once the
FAA gives the OK? AMNA NAWAZ: Meanwhile, at the same time, Boeing’s
chief executive, Dennis Muilenburg, is going to be testifying on Capitol Hill both before
a Senate and a House committee. What are some of those key questions you think
need to be answered right now? DAVID SHEPARDSON: Well, first, he lost his
title as chairman only one week ago today. The board stripped him of that title. And, no, he’s going to be asked a lot of questions. How come no one at Boeing has been disciplined
or fired as a result of this? Is it really your position that Boeing did
nothing wrong? I mean, their — publicly, they have said,
we — our only goal is to make a safe plane safer. And I think that’s the key questions that
are going to be asked. Did Boeing make mistakes? Was this a preventable tragedy? What exactly did Boeing know about this key
safety system? Did regulators know enough? And does the whole system of how planes are
certified to operate need to be changed? AMNA NAWAZ: I should point out, again, you
first broke this story. These are just some of the messages you have
been able to uncover. DAVID SHEPARDSON: Right. AMNA NAWAZ: Do you expect there could be more? DAVID SHEPARDSON: Well, just late tonight,
another 10 pages of e-mails went from the FAA to Congress from the same pilot involved
in these — in the internal text messages. So that sheds a little more light. They’re not as explosive as what we have seen
so far. But, no, I think, between the FBI, the I.G.
and others, more is going to come out about, what exactly did Boeing know internally during
that period? AMNA NAWAZ: We will be following your reporting,
for sure. David Shepardson of Reuters, thanks so much
for being here. DAVID SHEPARDSON: Thanks.

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